Not Just a Teacher

binge thinking on technology and education

Not Just a Teacher

Am I better off writing a letter to Santa?

July 26th, 2015 · No Comments · General

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vancour/8263691552

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vancour/8263691552

I had the pleasure of spending a day with @danhaesler last week. He gave a day of workshops on Teaching Kids to Stretch. This, as you would expect if you have followed any of his work, was very much part of his take on well-being. Having had many conversations with Dan and seen him present, I was keen to get my hands dirty with his ideas and the practicalities of application in this area not only as a teacher but as a parent of two primary school aged children.

The day was a great learning experience for me, and colleagues I shared it with tended to echo my feelings. Yet, it wasn’t the content that was so ‘out there’, so revolutionary, so mind-changing. In my opinion, it was the delivery that made the difference. I hold my hands up at this point and admit I like Dan as a person. I think we have a lot in common and despite the fact he was born on the wrong side of the Pennines, Lancashire not Yorkshire, he is a good sort. Yet, this doesn’t stop me from standing back and being as objective as I can. Hence, I would like to say he is damn good at what he does.

So, what makes him ‘damn good’ and other presenters, other workshop conveners, not so? To me, it comes down to the delivery style and he, as I witnessed @tombarrett do a couple of months earlier, used styles that, although different, were on the wave length of any average teacher. Dan’s anecdotal, storytelling (often including his own son) approach elevates the passion of his work. In my opinion, he presents his beliefs in applying Carol Dweck’s fixed/growth mindset in such a convincing fashion because he has real life examples that are really easy to imagine and empathise with.

In a chat with him over lunch that day, I asked him where all this work is going for him, where he sees himself in a few years. He shrugged in reply saying he didn’t know then said, “I’m just a PE teacher”. At the end of the day, he told the workshop that, “any of you could stand up and deliver this”. Unfortunately, he could not be further from the truth. Undoubtedly, some people in the room could have gone some way to match him but far more could not have. What Dan represents in my eyes, is someone who is willing to invest time in figuring out learners, what motivates them, what inspires improvements in their learning and ultimately in their achievements. In a similar way, it could be argued @tombarrett and the NoTosh crew have done likewise with learning activities. They have then devoted huge amounts of energy to honing their craft in how to deliver their messages to those at the coal face. This is no mean feat.

When I returned to school the next day gushing over my experiences with @danhaesler, a colleague of mine really summed it up for me. I said to him that much of what I learned was simple down-to-earth application of Carol Dweck’s work. His reply was something along the lines of, “yeah, but he has obviously taken the time to deconstruct Dweck’s work, to figure out how it can be applied and indeed how it should be best applied to maximise effectiveness. That has to be applauded.” This got me thinking about the difficulties full-time teachers face in mimicking Dan and Tom’s in-depth work. It is very difficult to both commit the time to gaining hardcore knowledge of such a subject but also to build up the presentation techniques that enable high quality delivery. Perhaps such opportunities need to be engineered by those strategically planning education systems. Or am I better off writing a letter to Santa?

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An unlevel playing field

June 9th, 2015 · 1 Comment · General

unlevel playing field

 

Digital technology is an unlevel playing field. In my opinion, it is the most unlevel playing field we have ever faced in education. Looking back at the history of education, there has been no other time when something has had such an effect on people yet the level of knowledge and expertise of users of technology is so difficult to determine. A bold statement you might suggest but let’s investigate this and look at the evidence.

Firstly, it is very important to look at digital technology as an umbrella term. I like this definition of it:

“the branch of scientific or engineering knowledge that deals with the creation and practical use of digital or computerized devices, methods, systems, etc” (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/digital+technology)

We commonly associate digital technology with use of devices, consumer devices, such as phones, tablets, laptops. Yet, as this definition shows, digital technology is also about creation not to mention the involvement of systems and methods. Highly significant in the unlevel playing field argument is an understanding of the breadth of the definition and the ‘creations and practical uses’ that can be seen as digital technology. To better comprehend this, let’s consider some examples, realistic scenarios, that are likely to be happening right now in schools anywhere in the developed world:

  • Young people who are highly proficient users of a particularly area of social media eg Tumblr. They know how to navigate and manipulate the space. They post and connect as they see fit. Some are very skilled at using this space to market their interests, to network
  • Teachers who have self-taught (or Youtube taught) network skills. They have experience as they have set up and maintained a small wired/wireless network
  • Young people who have used online interactive platforms eg Codecademy or MOOCs to teach themselves how to code in a particular language. They program their own robots or build apps and network with like-minded individuals worldwide via user groups and forums
  • Teachers who regularly use Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. They rely on these social media spaces to for friendship, sharing practice and socialisation. They are highly competent and active users who have developed know-how over years of use.

Of course I could go on and the list of examples demonstrating involvement in digital technology is vast.

Yet, the list above should not just be looked at in terms of what technology is being used for, what the involvement is. I listed sets of people, teachers/young people, and in any of the examples given they could be interchanged with ease. This is the second point in understanding this unlevel playing field: we rarely have any idea who has expertise let alone in what area of digital technology that expertise lies.

There is, however, a third point when we consider the people involved, namely, that formal education or schooling, qualifications, age, what is commonly referred to as experience have no bearing on who is involved in digital technology. The plethora of learning opportunities freely and readily available online are a conduit to expertise in areas of digital technology not to mention the expertise that can come from immersion, involvement and use.

So, all in all, when we look at digital technology, we look at an area of our lives that has many subsections, lots of specialisms. There are few factors we can point to that provide reliable evidence to enable easy identification of who has expertise and where that expertise lies. Hence, we have a huge unlevel playing field.

Image courtesy of http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Thorntonpitch.jpg

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Diving into Argument Mapping

February 23rd, 2015 · No Comments · General

I have had the pleasure of using Rationale recently to look at the concept of argument mapping. In it’s rawest form this can be seen as ‘essay writing with trainer wheels’ according to a colleague of mine. I really like how it visually represents prose and breaks down the structure of essays to enable students to see how to construct these pieces of work.

The visual nature of this tool enables students to be able to see how their work should be mapped out and how balanced or unbalanced discussions can be depending on the work being done.

argument An Argumentative template shows visually that you are creating an argument in favour of something.

 

 

 

 

issues

An Issues template shows in a similar way how the the reasons and objections are more balanced in this piece of work.

 

 

Using maps to plan out an essay in the map, provides students with their essay at the same time and the export facility gives an .rtf file that the students can use to further their work.

issuesexport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using the tool, brought into questions of whether students should be restricted, structured in their work from the outset or should they be left to play, to fall over in different ways (eg provide too many reasons in an essay that has a word limit). However, the tool does have facilities to accommodate your pedagogical approach.

I also have concerns about whether use of Rationale without strong teaching would lead to bland essays that had a very formulaic structure but perhaps that is what is needed. It could be argued that any tool still needs good teaching to support it so Rationale is no different in that respect.

All in all, I find this a really useful insight into a lovely example of how technology can enhance traditional educational practice.

 

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Adding to the Mission

November 23rd, 2014 · No Comments · General

As part of the #eNoob team, Urvi Shah provides a very interesting perspective on the mission of the eNewbies such as eLearning Coordinator, Director of Innovation, eLearning coach etc etc, in her blog post on Learn E-nabling: http://www.learnenabling.com/blog/what-is-our-mission/. However, as valuable as this might be given its simplicity, I wonder if it is missing key fundamental elements. Here’s my rework:

comm and trust

In my experience and in some ways supported by research if we look at teacher barriers to technology (Ertmer, 1999), we have to build confidence.I would argue that this is confidence in and with technology. I would all suggest that such confidence cannot exist without good communication in the community with which innovation is attempted and certainly not without trust.

In many ways, I think communication and trust go hand in hand. They compliment each other to foster the basis of growth, risk taking and innovation. Without these in place, we cannot inspire or lead any teacher to improve their practice.

 

Ertmer, P. A. (1999). Addressing first-and second-order barriers to change: Strategies for technology integration. Educational Technology Research and Development, 47(4), 47-61.

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The Limited Visibility of Learning

November 11th, 2014 · No Comments · General

I have spent a lot of time during this year involved in sessions organised by Macmillan based on John Hattie’s research  A lot of this has been valuable, probing and at times uncomfortable for many educators present when they have to produce data that exposes heir school and themselves. Yet, what really grates me is the delivery method and the lack of visibility.

How can a conference that professes to educate attendees on visible learning only allow visibility to paying attendees? (Surely, this comes under Cooperative learning which has an effect size of 0.59 in Hattie’s top 150 and it could be argued, surely, that it provides a more extensive classroom discussion which has an effect size of 0.82 and gets into the top 10)

Where is the enabling, facilitating and promoting of shared practice around such valuable PD? (I can’t find this in Hattie’s top 150 effect sizes so I’m not sure it’s ever been measured)

Why would a leading researcher on education run every session largely in a lecture style with a booklet supplied that attendees follow? (This seems to come under the banner of Direct instruction which has an effect size of o.59)

And if we move away from Hattie’s research and perhaps concern ourselves with Alec Couros, George Couros and Steve Wheelers’ views then there is a major push for the benefits of open, connected learning that is shared outside of the walls of a classroom or conference room. So, I am left feeling a little let down by a delivery mode which in it’s archaic style,in my opinion, leaves a lasting impression on educators who attend:

The sharing on a global scale, in a connected world of professional development that elements of social media offers us, does not matter that much. Maybe book sales and bums on seats at a premium rate do

 

 

 

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The Role of Parents

July 27th, 2014 · No Comments · General

I want to ask every educator in primary and secondary sectors, the following questions:

What exactly is the expected role of parents in your school?

In your classroom, what specific part(s) of each child’s education do you want parents to be involved with?  

How do you deal with parents who do not behave as you want them to in your school community?

What avenues exist for those parents who want to do what you are asking them to do, to be part of your community?  

Think about it. If, like me, you concern yourself with more than the content you want your students to learn or the experience that your teaching offers them then, as Graham Nutall’s book clearly states, there are ‘Hidden Lives of Learners’. If, like me, you truly believe that education is as significant in the home environment as it is in the classroom, then not only will you be adhering to strong messages from the ‘oh so delightful’ MacArthur Foundation (see video), but you will be concerned with parents.

Yet, in my experience as an educator and as a parent, many schools are confused with what they want from the parent community. Or maybe that’s a little harsh. Many schools are not confused but perhaps they are not telling the complete truth. Ask senior leaders in many schools what they want from parents of students and they will talk about active roles in their child’s education; support for what the school is trying to achieve and in many cases, opportunities for extension of the learning happening in the school environment. However, it seems that when parents don’t do exactly what is expected of them, then their foreseen role get’s kind of complicated. I am sure there are many educators out there who know the parents who are ‘pushy’. the ‘complainers’ but are some of these just doing what you want them to do and others struggling from a lack of clear guidance as to what role they are supposed to be playing.

So. let’s get to the last question regarding the avenues you are offering parents. And to me, this is where the parental portals that exist as part of many VLEs,really do fall very short of what is actually required or indeed desired. But then again, the primary school that invites parents into the classroom at specific times to play a part in a child’s learning – that can be as ill-conceived. The problem with this approach is not the concept or the idea but it’s the flexibility. It is only when the terms are exactly as stated and the plans go according to what the school and the teacher expects that such schemes seem to work. As already mentioned, when parents don’t do exactly what is expected of them, then these systems struggle. I think Seth Godin’s take on customer service has a good message for all of us in this regard.

I think it is time to be honest in each and every school community and make it clearer than clear as to what the role of parents actually is.

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I’ve Read a School Report

July 8th, 2014 · No Comments · General

I have just received a school report for one of my children. This is a mid year report. It doesn’t show me any progress, only attainment. It provides me with an effort and an achievement grade in a variety of subjects. There are no teacher comments on my child apart from the overall ‘Teacher comment’ at the end which gives a summary. This follows attainment grading in terms of Respect; Independence; Responsibility; Caring; Honesty. How does that sound? Does that comply with Australian DECD expectations of a report in a primary school? Does it compare to something similar in your school? How does it compare internationally?

But let’s throw some curve balls into the mix albeit curve balls that are real. This child has been psychologically assessed and found to have a literacy ability of equivalent to a 12 year old and a numeracy ability of a 13 year old. This is a child with an IQ way above her age (just turned 7). She is supposedly being extended to meet these needs. Yet, the report says she is achieving at only a Good standard not the highest level of Excellent. Does that mean she is not achieving at the level she is supposed to be working at for her age or the level she is  diagnosed as capable of? If it is the former then there are major issues surely with the teaching and learning happening here, especially as the effort level says Mostly and Sometimes for the two disciplines in Maths but overall she gets the highest level for following the school rules. Surely, that means she is severely under-performing and her effort level is way way way below what it could be given her mental capacity.

So let’s consider the later- she is not achievable at the level she is  diagnosed as capable of….. How does that work then? How does a parent or indeed the child know when the bar is being raised in terms of assessment and reporting and when it is not? Given that we know she is not being extended in other areas eg Science for instance, is the achievement grade for that subject for a typical 7 year old or for a child of her mental capacity and the level you would expect them to perform at? I’m confused. I hope you share my confusion.

Then we get into the issues of engagement. Do these snippets of information suggest a lack of engagement here? Or indeed, do they also suggest a lack of really addressing the needs of a child with very different needs? How can any education system really report in such a confusing manner when there are such diverse needs to address with any group of children? Please help me understand.

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A New Dimension in Blogging

May 27th, 2014 · No Comments · General

small-logo3Yesterday was the launch of a new project for me, Learn E-nabling, a collaborative website I have set up with international, cross-sector representation from people in the e-learning coordinator type roles. My reasons for devoting my time to the project and I would hope a shared view of all those involved, are set out here. I really hope we can spark some real insight into many facets of education in today’s’ schools in different parts of the world and the complexities of pedagogical and technological changes, if they are indeed happening as some would have us believe.

For me though, there is another rather exciting side to this. The concept of an individual within a team; a collaborative blog, posting his/her viewpoints and then the rest of the team commenting on that. Then that post and the comments are publicised via online mediums (Twitter, etc).  This provides not only the original authors’ views but the critique of that, the discussion, the comments. To me, this provides an opportunity to join a little discussion rather than just read a post. Almost, like a mini-forum. Now, I don’t know if this has been done before. Perhaps, it is a successful and well-used model. However, it is not something I can recall coming across.

The first post and the subsequent comments are here. I hope you can add yours to that post and the many posts that will follow

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The Parents Tech Issue and Chromebooks

May 5th, 2014 · 5 Comments · General

Admittedly, this has come a little earlier than expected but to have my daughter’s seventh birthday only a few days away and not being able to decide what technology to buy for her, raises issues I think it is important to share. The most important of these issues is the balance of cost/uses/limitations.

My daughter has no demands from her school to supply her with technology, unfortunately. To date, she has used the plethora of technology at home on a shared basis but there is clearly a demand for her to have her own device. I see a shelf-life of three years for this technology and I do not want to spend an exorbitant amount of money. My daughter wants to and likes to: play little browser games, write stories, develop picture books, draw and make presentations on her own. There are other digital things she does but she has access to an iPad in the house, a fairly high spec laptop and a Surface Pro.

So, I am thinking, why should I look any further than a Chromebook? Won’t this do most things for her? I know there isn’t a device out there that does everything all the time. But, it will surely be reasonably fast with 4Gb of RAM and not much to power really, she will largely use it the house with a decent wireless connection, it’s easy to manage and, to my mind, the exposure to a cloud based way of working can only benefit her. My wife brought up the issue with the occasions when she might want to take the device to places where she has to work offline. Research has shown me that the current generation of Chromebooks can be used offline easily. Is this a true picture? Does a Chromebook allow for saving locally? My wife also talked about the ability to be able to demonstrate her digital creations at school and the only options for this currently are printing and via a USB stick (quite shocking provision, I have to say). The Chromebook we are looking at has USB ports so this would not appear to be an issue but again, how well does the saving locally/downloading concept work on Chromebooks?

Any input and advice from anyone out there who has used or is using Chromebooks would be greatly appreciated. However, one thing sticks in my mind in all this…….if this causes me to ask such a plethora of questions, do we in education really appreciate the issues such decisions cause many parents?

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Tales of Shared Research

April 27th, 2014 · 1 Comment · General

This post provides my views on how 2 teachers in different countries and time zones have teamed up to research and publish academic writing. It provides an insight into what has been done, how it was done and the benefits of working this way.

I recently worked in Higher Education. In that time, I worked for and with academics. I began to understand the world of academic research, of publishing papers and journals, of collaborating in this process. I became involved in researching and writing papers, co-authoring 2 and being the lead author on 1 publication. In this process of research I felt I learned so much not only about research methods but about writing. I was challenged in many ways and I knew I benefited immensely from the experience. Hence, I wanted to bring something similar with me into the Secondary sector.

My memory is not brilliant so I can’t recall how it first came about but I think I asked @ianinsheffield if he would like to be a co-author on a paper for NAACE Advancing Education Journal to which he agreed. Why did I ask Ian? Well, I guess you could call it intuition but I think there a number of elements to look for in someone you want to write with and I saw them in Ian. I wanted someone who would challenge my assumptions but who ultimately knew most of my background, could empathise and likely would understand my angles. I liked reading his blog posts, liked his writing style and knew he was very interested in research.

So, basically, I already had the idea for the paper and needed to collect data. I put together a questionnaire via a Google form, shared it with Ian and he suggested amendments, challenged some of my questions, asked me to clarify certain areas, etc. The responses from the final questionnaire then provided data that we could both analyse individually, share our thoughts and interpretations. Again Google was used with a doc being shared in which we both wrote freely. Our shared thoughts on this doc provided a loose structure, a number of threads and angles on the area of research

After all these foundations, the actual writing begun. It was clear that Ian was happy for me to take the lead and I recall him asking what role I wanted him to play. I simply replied that I was going to just write an then if he could read and critique then that would be really helpful. He agreed and I began. I wrote at different times, as is normal in my way of working. I had long gaps where I did nothing then suddenly wrote quite a lot. Ian was shared on the doc and I expect he saw alerts in his inbox when I had done something but on most occasions, I would email him and tell him what I had done, sometimes adding reflections on what I had written or thoughts on where it was leading.

Ian commented on the doc. He scrutinized my work in more ways than I could have hoped. His suggestions reworded much of my writing and his research skills provided so many of the references that I doubt I would have ever had time to find on my own. And those really are the key benefits, in my opinion, to this way of working. Research can be time consuming. It can be another ‘thing’ educators have to do but it can be made so much easier. Collaborating in this way allows for greater insight and input, ensuring there is more than one specialist’s eyes on the writing but also reducing the workload in for example, searching for research in related fields.

This has now led Ian and I to produce a second paper that has been recently submitted to ACEC2014 in my home town of Adelaide. During this paper, we worked in similar ways except this time I began to notice a pattern that, to me, worked really well. I would often finish writing something on the shared Gdoc at night. Ian, is on the other side of the world in the UK and the time difference meant he was likely to be at work when I had finished writing. So, it seems he waited until he had free time in the evenings to look over what I had written. By this time, I had often slept, got up and was in to prepare for a days at work. I would switch on my computer and often find Ian editing the document or having just finished editing. I could then have a little general, overview chat with him about the paper and had his comments on the writing to look at then or later. In other words, the flow, the mix of synchronous and asynchronous communications, the one place for meeting and sharing and the timings worked so well for me.

Ian said he now has plans to lead on papers of his own and I can’t wait to provide a service to him and to aide the research process for the good of all.

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